As a training mechanism, Ultra Short is something that appeals to the masses. Not because its easy, but because its specific. It is race pace and it teaches you how to cope with swimming at race pace! USRPT (Ultra Short Race Pace Training) is a specific modality of Ultra Short work and is starting to be introduced to programmes worldwide. 

If it is something you have thought about but arn't too sure how to introduce the concept - here's a blog that will give you the basics for gettig started on a USRPT programme...

https://vbraceclub.wordpress.com/2016/02/03/getting-ready-for-usrpt/

Check out this recent blog about kicking into your Ultra Short regime in 2016 - perfect for individuals looking to maximise a minimal amount of pool time/space or for groups old and yound aiming to start a session the most effective way possible: Fast stuff first!!!

 

As with any type of training modality, Ultra Short is something that can fairly easily be explained and documented, but in the reality of actually performing a race pace set, questions and queries can be rife. This is often the case with 'example' sets: they are fine in principle, but where do you go to the next time? How is the training progressed?

In this New Year, New Series we are going to look at some specific set ideas and some progressions and regressions to assist adaptation to individual environments; all encased in week by week development schedule!!

Read more here...

 

Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) is a widely discussed element of sports training and whilst it is generally agreed that it is a vital component of any coaching repertoire, there is a lot of discussion and debate over the best model - if indeed there is one - and which factors are actually relevant to the individuals within the sport they partake.

Too often connotations of 'early specialisation' are brought up - particularly in relation to swimming - and there tends to be a desire to pay a large amount of attention to 'building qualities' and teaching and training young athletes 'how to train'. And the answer seems in a lot of cases to be volume. The perception that by giving young athletes a large amount of volume will enhance their potential for long term success is limited owing to the large amount of swimmers who drop out of the sport or who have to retire early due to injury.

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After a recent University Open Day and talking to some prospective swimmers - the question of Long Course (50m) training was raised. The assumption here is that for some as yet undefined reason long course training will be better for you than short course - I guess because its longer, and longer equals better, right? That's the traditional swimmer mentality for you right there.....

Longer doesn't equal better, BETTER = BETTER!!!

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One of the defining characteristics of USRPT is its adherence to the onset of neurological fatigue as the determining factor in improved performance endurance. This is in contrast to much of the traditional theory that alludes to acidosis as the limiting factor and by which suggests a training paradigm steeped in its accumulation as the perfect antidote!

As a swimmer I have taken part in many lactate sets; as a developing (come regurgitating) coach I have administered many lactate sets - the results have been conspicuously similar every time - sheer unadulterated pain, discomfort - and some of the slowest posted 100m times of mine or my athletes careers. At no point have I seen improvements in these sets, a better perceived tolerance to the pain, times anywhere near acceptable for a 100m sprint on the 5th repetition... Not to mention the recovery time required before the next 'proper' training session can commence...

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This is the first part of possibly lots of parts!!! That is to say its not a simple explanation that can be summed up in just one post. Even the USRPT creator Brent Rushall is constantly updating and adding definitions as new questions are thrown up around the subject. So this will be a bit of a drip feed of the information that Dr Rushall has pioneered, hopefully in a summarised version that will be easy (ish??) to digest... Read more...

So it seems Mr Lochte caused a bit of controversy at the Worlds this summer by performing his fly kicks (on the freestyle leg of the I.M) on his back!!
 
But it's freestyle right so that's ok?
 
According to FINA, probably not....
 
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Anaerobic threshold; lactate tolerance, EN1, A4 - sound familiar? No, lucky you!! If like me you have been involved in coach education during the past 50 years, these terms are going to appear pretty mainstay in the daily juggling of what to do when... and why!! However, if like me you're not really a fan of these labels, and you would rather look at the individual athlete than a set of predefined terms - then you will probably look on the above as a tad superfluous. Click here to read more...

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